ProjectsWhat Dreams May Comeinfo

What Dreams May Come


What Dreams May Come

Choreography and Dance by Nejla Yatkin
Video design by Enki Andrews
Music by Ahmed Saygun, Kamran Ince,
Soundmix by Craig Lee

This new evening length multi media solo dance explores the intersection and connection between the personal and the public and between how we perceive ourselves versus how we are perceived. The piece is set to music of Turkish composers Ahmet Saygun, and Kamran Ince and video installation by Enki. In this new solo we are experimenting with incorporating real-time and prerecorded video and projection body mapping that will respond to the body on stage and to the audience to create a narrative exploring the spaces between oppression, freedom, identity and anonymity through movement by incorporating Western Contemporary practices with traditional Turkish dance elements.


This solo was made possible in part through a grant from the Turkish Cultural Foundation in Washington, DC, The Between The Seas Festival in New York, through a residency at Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago, 3Arts, What Dreams May Come was developed in part during a residency at the Baryshnikov Art Center in New York and awarded through the Princess Grace Foundation - USA Works in Progress residency program.

"Ms. Yatkin is a magician, telling tales and creating worlds with understated images. She is behind more than choreography". - New York Times


Upcoming performance
January 14th to 30th residency at the Baryshnikov Art Center in New York
April 3rd, 4th and 5th, 2015 at Links Hall in Chicago, IL
May 13th, 2015 at ICPNA Miraflores in Lima, Peru.
June 23rd, 2015 at the National Theater in San Salvador, El Salvador
July 7th-8th, 2015 at the National Theater in Tegucigalpa, Honduras


Review
Chicago Tribune by Laura Molzahn

Residency wrap up at the Baryshnikov Art Center


When Nejla Yatkin lifts a finger, the whole room watches in hushed anticipation. For People With Wings opens with Yatkin lying on her back in a pile of black tulle and feathers. Her head is downstage, and her arms are expanded like wings. With very little movement she creates a scene that looks like it could be a projection of a black and white film, showing frame-by-frame the control and range of her wingspan. When she rises from the floor,ÃAfAfAfAfAfAAAAAA‚ÃAfAfAfAfAAAAA‚ÃAfAfAfAAAA‚ÃAfAfAAA‚ÃAfAA‚ÃA‚  the feathers are sent off in all directions. Her legs and torso have just as much if not more control than her muscular arms, and the piece becomes a duet with the layers upon layers of tulle. A woman in a tutu is so much more for Yatkin: ItÃAfAfAfAfAfÃAfAfAfAAAA‚ÃAfAfAAA‚ÃAfAA‚ÃA‚¢AAAAAAA€AAAAAAA™s a love affair, a struggle against nature, a choice between being covered up and revealing it all. Eventually she strips herself of the tutu, and rises out of the now lifeless fabric. Strong and powerful yet feminine and ethereal, she is surely the kind of muse the sculptor had in mind when creating the Winged Victory. - See more at: http://dancemagazine.com/reviews/December-2010/NY2Dance#sthash.ZcBWllui.dpuf
When Nejla Yatkin lifts a finger, the whole room watches in hushed anticipation. For People With Wings opens with Yatkin lying on her back in a pile of black tulle and feathers. Her head is downstage, and her arms are expanded like wings. With very little movement she creates a scene that looks like it could be a projection of a black and white film, showing frame-by-frame the control and range of her wingspan. When she rises from the floor,ÃAfAfAfAfAfAAAAAA‚ÃAfAfAfAfAAAAA‚ÃAfAfAfAAAA‚ÃAfAfAAA‚ÃAfAA‚ÃA‚  the feathers are sent off in all directions. Her legs and torso have just as much if not more control than her muscular arms, and the piece becomes a duet with the layers upon layers of tulle. A woman in a tutu is so much more for Yatkin: ItÃAfAfAfAfAfÃAfAfAfAAAA‚ÃAfAfAAA‚ÃAfAA‚ÃA‚¢AAAAAAA€AAAAAAA™s a love affair, a struggle against nature, a choice between being covered up and revealing it all. Eventually she strips herself of the tutu, and rises out of the now lifeless fabric. Strong and powerful yet feminine and ethereal, she is surely the kind of muse the sculptor had in mind when creating the Winged Victory. - See more at: http://dancemagazine.com/reviews/December-2010/NY2Dance#sthash.ZcBWllui.dp